If you've been injured in a pedestrian accident, it's vital that you act quickly. Here's what you need to know.

If you enjoy jogging, going for a morning walk, or even riding your bike in the evenings, it's important to take careful precautions when you go out. Each year, approximately 7,000 cyclists and pedestrians are killed in traffic accidents, according to the Pedestrian and Bicycle Information Center. Accidents can happen to anyone regardless of age or experience. Whether you've been jogging for years or you're just starting to exercise, it's vital that you are careful and aware of your surroundings; however, even the most cautious of adults may find that they have been involved in a pedestrian accident. If this happens to you, there are a few things you need to know before you reach out to your personal injury attorney.

1. Seek medical care immediately

Pedestrian accidents, even when not fatal, can be incredibly serious. It's possible to experience a broken bone, a sprained limb, or even a concussion. Whether you have visible injuries or not, make sure you seek medical treatment from your primary care provider or at your local emergency room. It's important to have a medical screening in order to carefully evaluate the extent of your injuries. Remember: some of your injuries may not be apparent until later. Visiting your doctor right away can give you a baseline for medical treatment. If you begin to feel worse in a few days or a few weeks, your doctor will be able to reference their original notes about your condition when determining your treatment plan.

2. Talk with the police

You might not want to bother the police, especially if you only experienced minor injuries; however, it is absolutely imperative that you speak with the police department as soon as possible. Ideally, you should call from the scene of the accident. Even if the other person flees the scene, make sure you call the police from the site of the accident. The responding officer will take your statement and file a police report. This will be beneficial for several reasons. First of all, it creates documentation that the accident happened when you said it did. This also helps should you need to go to court in order to seek damages from the injury.

3. Take care of yourself

Dealing with a situation involving a personal injury is generally a stressful experience. Maybe you were crossing the street when you were hit by a motorcycle. Maybe you were jogging when a car clipped you. Perhaps someone hit you while you were in a marked crosswalk. No matter what happened to you, make sure that you take time to care for your own mental and emotional needs. You may find that speaking with a therapist who specializes in trauma can be incredibly helpful during this time. Additionally, you should reach out to friends and family members who may be able to offer additional support.

When you're ready to start moving forward after your injury, contact your personal injury attorney. They will evaluate your case and discuss your next steps with you.